Voice Therapy

Typically “voice disorders” are considered those involving conditions of the larynx or vocal cords that create our voices, but at CLK SPEECH, Carole Kornsweig recognizes that voices can also be disturbed in its passage through the oral and nasal cavity and in the usage of the rise and fall of pitch of ones voice that make the sound of our “talk” more or less interesting.

Voice Disorders (Laryngeal)

At CLK Speech, treatment for hoarse or raspy voices, or voices that “give out” involves improving vocal hygiene, and retraining of improper or poorly coordinated breathing and vocalization and eliminating destructive compensations for physiological disturbances, achieving resonance and reduction of physical tension in the laryngeal area. CLK speech incorporates Lessac-Madsen Resonant Voice Training, and Myofascial Release techniques to reduce laryngeal and paralyaryngeal tension. All treatment is performed after being evaluated and referred by an ENT.

Typical conditions treated at CLK Speech include:

  • Vocal Nodules and Polyps
  • Muscle Tension Dysphonia
  • Vocal cord bowing
  • Paresis
  • Chronic hoarseness
  • Irritable Larynx

Resonance Disorders

This refers to disorders that involve an incorrect direction of the voice through the nasal versus oral passages. CLK Speech can help normalize resonance to the extent that the physiology of the physical structures and functions are adequate, by manipulating the work of the other articulators and vocal projection.

CLK Speech can help normalize resonance to the extent that the physiology of the physical structures and functions are adequate, by manipulating the work of the other articulators and vocal projection.

HYPERNASALITY/NASAL EMISSION

Hypernasality is a resonance disorder involving the inability of the soft palate to close off the nose, resulting in a hyper-nasal voice quality, which is characteristic of people with repaired cleft palates or other conditions affecting soft-palate function.

HYPONASALITY

This resonance issue occurs when the nasal cavity is blocked off either for structural or habitual reasons and that person sounds like he forever has a cold.

Prosody Disorders

This concerns the melody of our speech—the rise and falls of vocal pitch levels, where we put our emphasis, and the rhythm of our speech. Disruptions can impede communication greatly. Disruptions can be due to neurological concerns (e.g. dysarthria, dyspraxia) or autism spectrum disorders, or non-disorders such as those who are second language learners.